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Author Topic: George William Stewart an Apprentice boy on the U.S.S. Minnesota in 1876  (Read 6400 times)
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mattscar
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« on: April 15, 2010, 11:33:13 PM »

My G-G-Grandfather, George William Stewart from New Jersey was an Apprentice boy from March 24 1876 - October 23 1880. He was exactly 21 years of age when he was discharged, his birth date is 23 October 1859.  From the limited paper work I have it says he was on the U.S.S. Minnesota at least when he finished and said he was a "top-Captain" and lists other positions on the boat that I currently do not have access to.  I also believe for most of his time he was stationed in the New York Ship yard and near the end was in Baltimore where he met his wife and he married very shortly after. This man has eluded me because somewhere before the 1900 census he Divorces/ and or leaves his wife and disappears.  I wonder if there is any sort of list that has been accumulated that might give more information than I do have.  I am also wondering if the the young apprentice ships for training had muster rolls.  Any information on any of this would be sincerely appreciated.

Matt Arnold Huh?
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Mary Mulvihill Pecoraro
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2010, 11:12:50 AM »

I have a copy of the "Manual for Officers Serving on Board U. S. Cruising Training Ships, 1899" printed by the Unites States Bureau of Naval Personnel.  This copy was obtained via Alibris but some major college libraries are lucky enough to have copies in their collections. [ Cornell, Duke, the Naval Academy, Norwich University, et. al...]

From my copy I learned that "...Apprentices are detailed as boatswain's mates, captains of tops, coxswains, quartermasters, gunner's mates, corporals of the guard, signal boys, and orderlies.  A fresh detail is made every two weeks, so that all can reap the advantages...Placing boys in positions of trust and authority matures them and strengthens their character by encouraging habits of self-reliance and responsibility...as boatswain's mates and captains of tops they must have a practical and intimate knowledge of all that relates to sails, rigging, etc..."

"...During sail exercises the captains of tops and light-yard men alone will remain aloft.  At all times, except during the progress of an evolution, these men will remain in the tops inside of the topmast rigging..."

Hope this information was helpful.  My grandfather was an Apprentice Boy from 1899-1904, later rising through the ranks and eventually becoming a Lieutenant Commander with a specialty in ordnance, retiring, finally, in 1946.
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cwwhite
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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2010, 11:48:23 PM »

Thank you Mary, any information like this is a great resource for those that are researching.
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