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Author Topic: researching my grandfather, Daniel Mulvihill, who was an apprentice boy in 1899  (Read 6665 times)
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Mary Mulvihill Pecoraro
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« on: November 01, 2009, 12:44:40 PM »

Daniel Mulvihill began his naval career in March of 1899.  One of his first ships assigned to was the U. S. S. Constellation which was being used as a training ship in Newport, RI.   Would love other information about that era of the apprentice boy program
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cwwhite
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« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2009, 10:21:15 PM »

HI, I did some checking around for your grandfather and wondered if he is the same as Lieutenant Daniel F Mulvihill stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma in 1920.   I do know that you can contact the curator of the US Naval Training Ship Constellation in Baltimore Harbor to see if he has any information on your grandfather.  The email is:  daldridge@constellation.org  He may even be listed in "Our Naval Apprentice" magazine, the first issue, which I believe the Constellation has a copy.  To respond to your second question as to what life was like as an Apprentice Boy, please refer to my website.  There should be plenty to extract from.

Chuck White
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Mary Mulvihill Pecoraro
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2009, 04:41:12 PM »

Hello, Chuck!  Yes, my grandfather, Daniel F. Mulvihill, was a Lieutenant on the USS Oklahoma from 1918-1921.   Torpedo Officer, Watch and Division.  Prior to that service he was an inspector of torpedoes as a liason between the Navy and the E.W.Bliss Company, who manufactured torpedoes in Brooklyn, NY

I am quite excited that you have found his name in your research and would be most curious to learn more details. 

Meantime, I was able to view a copy of the "Manual for officers serviing on board U. S. cruising training ships, 1899" at Norwich University within the last two weeks.   This manual is a wealth of information regarding the specific pieces of knowledge and training that apprentice boys would have had to have been taught and to have learned.  The book has been digitzed on Google Books and various other public and university libraries throughout the country have copies of it. 

Mary Mulvihill Pecoraro
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