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Author Topic: December 1903 - Our Naval Apprentice  (Read 6282 times)
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cwwhite
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« on: September 28, 2007, 01:14:22 PM »

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http://navalapprentice.white-navy.com/1903_12.shtml
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Navyman834
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2008, 03:01:29 AM »

Our Naval Apprentice, Dec. 1903, page 145
The Navyman has had to endure Christmas at sea since ships first to sea. The Apprentice Boy at his young age may have never been away from home on Christmas before and the poem “The Sailor’s Christmas Eve” was a well written piece that is an apt description of the Sailors life and Christmas Eve, and he never knew what the next days might bring him.

This reminded me of the days of deterrent patrol on an FBM Submarine.  The entire patrol was spent submerged typically at 100 to 200 feet and never coming to periscope depth generally for the 70 day patrol. The entire crew would look forward to the night we referred to as half way night. There would be packages for each crew member provided by their families prior to getting underway for patrol and I as COB stored each of these packages in a locked space where only I had access. I would generally go through all these packages to insure each crew member got a package, this night of opening packages, singing and skits performed by crew members was a morale booster for the crew and all hands always seemed to enjoy it. But the crew knew there were still 35 more days of patrol to go through and each man I am sure would contemplate what might occur during those days.

Navyman834
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Navyman834
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2008, 03:07:39 AM »

An interesting article on the history, construction and use of the anchor should be important to all Sailors. “Our Naval Apprentice” Dec.1903, page 145 gives that history. There has always been many sea stories told by old salts that involved the anchor.

One of the first ones that I can recall is a sea story told to young Navy Apprentices or civilians and goes like this. – When I get my 20 years in the Navy I am going to go down to Navy salvage and get an anchor. I will put it on my back and make a course straight inland. When someone stops me and asks me what that is that I am carrying on my back I will throw it down right there, and that is where I will spend the rest of my life.

Navyman834
« Last Edit: July 26, 2008, 01:36:51 AM by Navyman834 » Logged
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