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Author Topic: November 1903 - Our Naval Apprentice  (Read 9032 times)
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cwwhite
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« on: September 27, 2007, 09:41:02 PM »

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http://navalapprentice.white-navy.com/1903_11.shtml
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Navyman834
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2008, 01:52:15 AM »

Shipmates,

The poems about Battles, Officers, Ships, Gunners, Apprentice Boys and all things of the sea are very interesting. How inspiring many of these things can be. The full wording of the Star-Spangled Banner is presented on the introductory page of the November 1903 issue. I am not very familiar with all the verses as we normally only hear the first verse. I found it very interesting that Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote another verse that is sometimes recognized, but in research I found it is not commonly used.

The paragraph that follows the lyrics of the National Anthem explains that all officers and men should stand at attention when the Anthem is being played, if conditions permit them to do so. Notice there is no mention of saluting the flag in that paragraph.

In the same vein, there is a Congressional Bill that allows veterans of the United States Military Services to salute the United States Flag, even though they are not in uniform, and regardless of their being covered or not. The act is granted by Senate Bill S. 1877.

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Navyman834
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2008, 11:32:32 PM »

Shipmates,
In the Nov. 1903 issue of “Our Naval Apprentice” on page 127 is an article titled “The Lucky Bag”. In over 150 years the lucky bag did not change a great deal.

The lucky bag was something I became very familiar with on my first Destroyer, the USS Turner (DDR 834). The Chief Master at Arms (CMAA) on that ship was FTC Harris and he was a gravel voiced, tough old Chief, and being a Fire Control Technician he was also my direct boss. After being on that Destroyer and working for Chief Harris for awhile he knew he could control me, so he got me appointed to the Master at Arms staff. One of my jobs was to go through all the berthing compartments each day prior to noon chow and pick up any gear adrift in those compartments and take those things to the lucky bag. I did not relish doing that job, and I would tell the compartment cleaners at breakfast (you know everybody on a Tin Can, and of course the MAA had to monitor the chow line, and I would remind them at that time) to make sure they picked up gear adrift and that helped many a Sailor from having to work off extra duty for leaving his belongings out where they would be found by the MAA in their daily rounds.

The article on page 127 “The Lucky Bag” was fairly accurate even to the time I was on the MAA Force. This was in 1960-1962. Except that things were never sold that were found as gear adrift, but there was extra duty given for articles that could be identified as belonging to an individual. There were times that I remember Sailors coming to me and asking if a certain thing had been turned into the lucky bag because they knew they may have to suffer for it. I generally treated these Sailors as I did individuals over my entire career, I would check with their LPO and if this individual was a good man for his Division and his ship, I in most cases would manage to get that item or items back to him, without any suffering on their part. 

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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2008, 11:04:48 PM »

THE SILENT LEAGUE

“Such punishment as a court-martial may adjudge may be inflicted on any person in the Navy who is guilty of profane swearing, falsehood drunkenness, gambling, fraud, theft, or any other scandalous conduct tending to the destruction of good morals.”—Article 8, par. 1, of the Articles for the Government of the Navy.

This is the way that page 142 of “Our Naval Apprentice” Nov. 1903 Issue starts out. Such articles have existed in all publications that govern a Navymans conduct even in modern times. Even though a Sailor was discouraged from using poor conduct the public opinion of Sailors was always dubious at best. “Drink like a Sailor” “swear like a Sailor” was the typical way a Sailor was judged by the civilian population, but that was never the conduct of the majority of Sailors as I witnessed for 24 years service.

We did not have The Silent League when I was a Sailor but the UCMJ was always present and could strike if one violated any part of it. In 1955 a Seaman that worked for me was called to the Gunnery office and they informed him that his enlistment had been extended by the President for 1 year, his first words were, f--- Eisenhower, and the Gunnery Officer who was in the Gunnery office at the time wrote him up for that. The Seaman went to Captains Mast and was given, 3 days confinement with bread and water, as punishment. His division also had to suffer, because for this 3 days they had to stand watch over him while he was confined. This was along with the other watches they were already standing. This was our silent league and I expect many Sailors learned lessons from this incident.
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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2008, 02:20:51 AM »

Sailors always felt they were close to land when they saw birds, but that was not necessarily true. When the Sailor knew he was a thousand miles from land and still would see a seabird then the question would arise how the bird might drink, all Sailors were taught that you could not drink saltwater and the question of birds drinking saltwater, or what they would drink was approached in Our Apprentice Boys, Nov 1903, page 143 bottom left.

The answer is not correct and it has since been discovered that sea birds can drink saltwater, and have an orifice on the upper part of they beak where the salt is dispelled.

Navyman834
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